Tag Archive | stories

Video Games and Writing – Part 2

Before we begin with today’s topic, I wanted to post some updates from me. So, over the weekend, I removed all my original stories from online, but for Writing.com. Why you wonder? Well, my original stories were online long enough. Now since I’m working on the rewrite for Clash of Tides (and hoping to submit it at the end of the year), it’s time for a change. Going forward, I won’t be posting my full rough drafts online anymore. To everyone who read my stories, thanks for the support! I won’t lie, the journey of posting my stories online has been conflicting, and I can’t say I enjoyed it. However, with this day and age of the internet, it’s something I needed to experience.

If Clash of Tides gets picked up (which I doubt), I’ll be sure to let everyone know!

Now for today’s post!

If you follow my blog, then you know I’ve posted about this before. Lately, my time has been spent playing this:

1 - Zelda Breath Of The Wild Title GIF.gif

It’s been years since I’ve returned to my video games ways, but with all the good games out, I couldn’t resist. The Legend of Zelda games is one of my favorites! I especially love Link’s character.

In addition to playing Breath of the Wild, I’m also working on 9/Nine Realms right now. My goal is to get the rough draft of 9/Nine Realms done before the end of the year. 9/Nine Realms is my first Epic Fantasy, and the world-building is difficult for me; however, Breath of the Wild has inspired me to try some new things. So like my post before, I want to point out the benefits of playing video games and being a writer.

1. Experiencing an adventure – When we read books, we’re following along with the characters on their journey, but with reading, we’re not interacting with the world the writer created. With video games, especially games like Breath of the Wild, we get to actually experience the world. Of course, I don’t mean with the five senses. I mean we get to explore the world and learn about the lore.

For example, let’s say in your story, you need more experience writing puzzles in a dungeon or sending your characters on a quest to recover something. If a video game takes place in a fantasy world (it’s own world), you can experince that in the game. From there, you can build upon that inspiration and write your story.

2. The lore – When playing an Epic Fantasy game, you learn about the lore of the world and how everything ties together. Sure, you can read that in a book, but it is fun when you see images of old gods and royalty in games.

Thanks to Breath of the Wild, I was able to get inspired for 9/Nine Realms, so I’m excited to see how the story progresses.

I mean, come on, look at theses:

Zelda_2

Zelda_1

Question: For you, what is the hardest part about world-building? When it comes to world-building, what inspires you?

Thanks for reading! I’ll respond to all comments tomorrow!

 

 

Burnout (For Writers)

Hey, everyone! I’m trying to get back to my normal posting schedule, so please forgive me for not being on track. To give you a quick update, I’ve been working on plotting out 9/Nine Realms and doing some world-building. For my past stories, I didn’t do enough world-building, so I want to improve that with 9/Nine Realms. Once I get the world and lore done, I plan to start writing the rest of the story!

For today, I want to discuss “Burnout.” I’m sure that everyone knows what burnout is, but if you don’t, here is the definition:

“Physical or mental collapse caused by overwork or stress.” – Google.com 

This is the definition I’ll be discussing today. As writers, we’re always writing, always thinking, and most importantly, we want to grow our readership. If you focus on everything we have to do as writers, it’s easy to burn your mind out.

Hell, there is:
Marketing
Character Design
Author (writer) Platform
The Actual Writing
Blogging
The Actual Writing 

Editing
Cover Design
Finding Beta Readers
The Actual Writing

That’s a lot, and really, we don’t want to do this to our manuscripts:

Burnout

I can add more to that list, but I feel this is enough. Basically, there’s a lot of stuff to do. In a way, being a writer is a job, but sadly, a job you don’t get paid for, yet.

If you look at the list and oh, let’s add “read other writers’ stories too, then it’s easy to burn yourself out. Remember, take a breather and relax. We want to write, publish, and get our stories to our readers, but burning ourselves out won’t help.

In the past, I spent every waking moment writing. My only focus was to get better, to make my readers happy and grow my readership. However, in the end, it was kind of pointless. So yeah, I improved my writing skills, and some readers enjoyed my work, but sadly, my writing obsession hasn’t paid off for me.

Maybe I was rushing it, or perhaps I didn’t take the time to breathe. Once in awhile, do this:

realx.gif

The important thing is, don’t burnout! When you burn yourself out, you can’t write, you can’t focus or think, and you’ll be miserable. If you find being a writer is overwhelming, take a step back and relax. For me, when I get super stressed about my stories, I lay down, close my eyes, and imagine the world I’m writing about for fun. Maybe closing your eyes and spending time with your characters will relax your mind. What I mean is, don’t work, just shut your eyes and go into the world of your imagination.

Question: When you’re overwhelmed with your stories, how do you relax?

P.S. 1,428 followers!! Thank you so much for following me!!
All gifs are from giphy.com

My Return

I'm Back

Hey, everyone!

I didn’t mean to be MIA for so long, but my Vegas trip really tired my body out. I had a great time! I even got inspired to write a new short story that I may turn into something else later.

How is everyone doing? Sorry for the lack of updates. I do plan to update something soon, so I hope you’re ready to read some new content.

Also, I plan to get some artwork of my characters done again! Is there any particular character you want to see?

I’ll catch up with everyone soon.

Right now, I’m working on the following:

Planning my trip to Tokyo
– Learning Web Development, refreshing my Japanese, and working on Technical Writing
– Finalizing Clash of Tides and working on the second draft
– Reaching out to editors
– Plotting out 9/Nine Realms

Basically, I’ll be like

work work work

What are you all working on?

PS. I still need to respond to comments, and I’ll do that soon.

 

What Makes a Good Writer?

Hey, everyone! So, I know I’ve been MIA for a while, but I do have an excuse. Last week, well, that just wasn’t my week. I’m hoping this week will be better, so I’m keeping my fingers crossed.

To summarize, I was having issues with the house, my debit card information got stolen, again, and my car window stopped working, so it’s been crappy. However, I am going out of town for Memorial Day weekend. There won’t be any new posts or chapter updates, but I’ll be sure to update when I return.

Now, onto today’s topic! I want to discuss what makes a good writer. This subject goes back to my own writing journey and wanting to build up my readers online. As I was walking through the city, I thought about the following questions:

– What makes a bad writer?
– What makes a good writer?
– What makes an awesome writer?
– What makes an excellent writer?

I feel like every writer will have a different answer to these questions, but for the purpose of this post, I will start with only the first two questions.

Back when I was trying to build my following online, I often wondered if I was a bad writer. To explain further, I didn’t have a huge following compared to other writers, so I just assumed I was a bad writer. When I thought about it some more, I realized a bad writer is more like a writer who gave up. Now, there’s nothing wrong with leaving writing behind, but it’s never a good idea to quit something before you try every option (if you’re trying something new, it takes about 6 months to a 1 year to see any signs of improvement).

To me, a bad writer isn’t one with grammar errors, plot holes or undeveloped characters in their work, it’s a writer who gave up too soon.

In the words of Neil Gaiman,

Don'tgiveup.gif
That takes me to the next question, what makes a good writer? Well, to me, it’s simple, a good writer is one that:

burce
If you’ve been discouraged in the past but kept on writing, then you’re a good writer. Why? Because you didn’t give up, and you’re still trying to improve your craft. You may not be an awesome writer, but you’re on your way there. It’s sad that it took me so long to realize this, but it’s import to focus on the writing. Everything else may let you down – fellow writers, readers, and various social media sites – but your characters will always be there for you, waiting for you to tell their story. 

So what do you think? What do you think makes a bad writer and a good writer?

Also, I will respond to everyone’s comment! And as always, thanks so much for reading and supporting my blog!

(images from https://giphy.com)

Writers’ Groups and Thoughts

Hey, everyone!

I wanted to let you all know I’m still alive, and I’m sorry for the lack of updates. First, I want to thank everyone who commented on the previous blog post. I wrote that blog post to get other writers’ opinions on the Goodreads issue, and I’m glad to report that she was able to get her story removed from Goodreads. I strongly believe that a writer should be able to get their unpublished manuscripts removed from Goodreads, and not be forced to have their work posted there.

If you find your unpublished work posted to Goodreads, you can get it removed, but please keep in mind that readers can post the story and review it.

In other news, I’ve been in a slump recently, probably because I try to help people and get no appreciation or understanding. I get someone being mad or upset, but I don’t care for people who are passive aggressive or give someone the silent treatment. But that’s human nature, I guess.

Anyway, today, I wanted to talk about Writers’ Groups. I know I’ve mentioned this a little bit in the past, but I wanted to discuss “in-person” groups. Since I’ve been taking my writing class, I’ve found I really enjoy a small collection of writers sitting down and discussing their work.

There’s a special feeling you get when speaking about your work in real life, with like-minded individuals. We talk about our stories; we mention different writing styles, writers we enjoy, and ways to break writing rules.

When you’re with other writers, you’ll think:

you'll think

Honestly, after experiencing a real-life writers group, I feel all serious writers should find their own group. Of course, only if they want to. While meeting writers online can be fun (and frustrating), it doesn’t beat having your own dedicated circle of writer friends that will support you and review your work. I don’t want to cheapen online friendships, but if you can, try to turn those friendships into real life ones. When you can sit around, laugh, and bounce ideas off other writers, it’s nice to feel you’re not alone.

You’ll feel like:

hug

Question: do any of you have a real life writers group you meet with? If you do, can you share with us your experiences?

(I plan to be active on my blog again, so don’t worry)

Goodreads, where should we draw the line? (For Writers)

Hey, everyone! It wasn’t my intention to post this topic today, but another writer and I have been discussing this recently.

To give you some background, and some of you may already know this, I learned a few weeks ago that stories posted on Wattpad are considered self-published by sites like Goodreads. You may be asking, “Aka, why is this important?”

Well, I’ll tell you. Some writers on Wattpad, mostly the popular ones, have been getting Goodreads reviews on their books. The issue here is, the stories they posted are first drafts, not finalized products. When we think of Goodreads, we think of a place to review published and finalized self-published books, not first drafts online.

Since the stories posted to Wattpad are free, we’re wondering if it’s right that readers are leaving detailed reviews on unedited work. The “where should we draw the line?” question comes from the fact these stories are free. It is right that readers are posting detailed reviews and rating on books that are still in progress? Giving feedback on Wattpad is fine, but should that also apply to Goodreads? To explain further, I mean that some writers may not want early draft reviews posted to Goodreads, as they still have time to edit and fix their work. Not only that, but the reviews may hinder the writer from posting their work in the future.

Also, Goodreads has confirmed they won’t remove detailed reviews for first draft Wattpad books, as they are self-published to Wattpad. So, even if you, as the writer, request these reviews to be removed, they won’t do. In short, “completed Wattpad books are considered self-published. The same also applies to other websites like Fictionpress.”

However, posting work online as become even more complex with Wattpad’s ads revenue program and websites like Radish. With the revenue program, readers click on ads in Wattpad’s popular stories, thus providing money for the writer. And with Radish, readers are actually PAYING for the story (for those who follow me, I covered this in another post.) On Wattpad, even if the readers aren’t spending their own money, they are providing money to the writers by watching the ads.

My writer friend feels that if a reader paid for the story through Radish (or other sites like Tapas and Kindle, of course, they have a right to post the review on Goodreads.)

For myself, I have mixed feelings about this. It’s a known thing in the internet world that if you post your work online, you’re opening yourself up to this – getting bad reviews, people stealing your work, and losing first publishing rights.

Also, since this mostly happens to popular writers online, it’s to be expected. Honestly, you can’t get 1M+ reads and think you’ll get away unscathed. Some think the number of reads shouldn’t matter, but what do you think?

I do know this has happened to lesser known writers online, too, but not as much. In the end, it’s a moral argument. I’ll be honest about my feelings, though, when you post your work online, anything can happen. Some Wattpad writers and other writers on different websites feel readers are entitled, and I do agree with this.

We can’t stop readers from posting reviews on our stories, free, first drafts, or not, but what do you all feel about this?

The important discussion for today: Do you think first drafts posted online should receive reviews on Goodreads? Where do we draw the line with Goodreads reviews? Do you feel these reviews will hurt the writer’s future with trying to publish later?

(If you have an opinion, please post it. We want to know what other writers think about this. And as a warning, please be careful when you post your work online. We both didn’t know about the Goodreads thing. For this reason, I’m very glad I no longer post my long stories on Wattpad.)

1-year Anniversary!!

I wanted to post this earlier, but I had writing class tonight. So, I saw this in my notifications:

1-year Anniversary

 

Today, marks a year ago that I left Wattpad behind to create my own website. I’m always amazed how much can change in one year, but looking back on everything, it was for the best.

I’ve met so many writers here, and all of them are awesome, wonderful people. Basically, there are many adjectives to describe them ^___^

I don’t want to list out specific blogs, but I want to say thank you to everyone for supporting me throughout the year. When I first started this blog, it was to ease my pain from another writing site. Over this year, I regained my confidence back as a writer, and my self-doubt has retreated somewhere in the depths of my mind (and I hope it stays there).

If you are struggling as a writer, don’t give up. I know it sounds cliche, but you really have to keep pushing yourself. It’s a scary thought giving up before you even know your real potential. And that’s what I almost did, but now, I finally feel well-rounded as a writer.

So, I don’t have much to blog about today since this is just a thank you post, but I did see this eariler:

 

The Gunslinger by Stephen King was one of the first books I read that got me into fantasy. As for the trailer, I have my own feelings on it, but it sparked a question I wanted to ask you all.

If you had a choice, what medium would you choose for your stories and why? Would you choose a tv show, movie, anime, or stay in book format?

For my stories, I always imagined them in anime form. Honestly, I don’t know how I feel about actors playing my characters. The joy of anime format is the characters can look the way you want since they don’t need a cast. So, what about you, what medium would you choose?